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How the Ship Was Shattered; by Sharif Gemie

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Sharif Gemie uses the Newport Ship as a focal point in his story. It was  previously published in a book edited by  Angela Platt,  Crosscurrents: The Newport Ship; Stories and Poems by Cwtsh Writers  (Green Corner Press, 2017). Her book was printed as a  contribution  to a Ship-related event.             I wok e up slowly, very slowly, consciousness trickling into my mind, drop by drop. I felt like I'd  slept for ages. Gradually I opened one eye. Even with just this, I could sense the sunlight outside. Then, looking out properly with both eyes, I saw a bright, crisp, clear May day, and I felt like getting up.             When you’re as old as I am, you take this slowly. I was coming out from a deep, deep sleep, and there was no sense in rushing. I got up cautiously, stretching my limbs carefully, testing to be sure that they were working. Take it slow! I stumbled to the edge of my cave, and looked out over those green hills, shining in the morning sunlight. Even at my age, ther

Designing and Constructing the Footbridge

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         Designing and Constructing the Footbridge The centre section was lifted into position using the Gottwald crane on a revised boom length to achieve clearances over the front mast hairpin and cables.          Designing and Constructing the Footbridge    Newport  Unlimited Footbridge Timelapse    Footbridge Construction 2006                                                   See also Why Newport City Footbridge won the steel design award in 2007.  Steel Construction.info is a free encyclopedia for UK steel construction information. Click below to open article. Steel Construction Information

The Bridges of Newport with reference to the Black and Amber.

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The Bridges of Newport with reference to the Black and Amber.  By G. J. Chapman I came to Newport in 1956 to start my education at Newport Hugh School. Apart from the Transporter Bridge  the only crossing of the River Usk was Newport Bridge, which at that time was struggling to cope with hundreds of shale lorries going to the site of Llanwern Steel Works. I very often had to leave the bus at Clarence Place and walk to the High School in Queen's Hill.  This was the bridge in 1937 and the shops were not demolished until 1968, so it would have looked like this when Geraint arrived in Newport in 1956. I remember Newport RFC's greatest days in 1963, the victory over the All Blacks. There were 2400 in the crowd, most of whom had crossed Newport Bridge. To see more click here:  Reliving the day Newport RFC beat the 1963 All Blacks. The George Street Bridge had been built in 1964 followed some years later by the Southern Distributor Bridge - both pretty remarkable structures which did

Out of sight out of mind

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Peter Dimery relates how the River Usk saved lives from disease in the 19th century but became so polluted in the 20 th century that Newport County Borough Council had to deal with the problem OUT OF SIGHT, OUT OF MIND.   I came to Newport in 1964 to lead an engineering team to clean the waters of the River Usk Estuary. Had the footbridge been built then the smell from the waterborne waste in the river crossing would have been most unpleasant. Why?  Let’s go back even earlier to 1848. Newport was not a healthy place to be. There was a Public Inquiry. Its purpose, to examine the filthy urban living conditions, when sewage discharged into the streets causing various public health threats, including the spread of many diseases such as cholera and typhus. Click here to access  The Clark Report  of 1848.  Here is part of the Inspectors report: “During the prevalence of the cholera epidemic the deaths have been, from the 31st May 1849 to the date of this Inquiry 112 persons.  I regret tha

Newport artist Justin Brown has provided paintings for us to showcase and allowed us to use his excellent prose.

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Newport artist  Justin  Brown has provided paintings for us to showcase and allowed us to use his excellent prose.  He states on his  webpage   'I've lived in Newport, since 1969, when I was five.  I like to work directly from life, in 'plein air' . My watercolour sketches are really just coloured in drawings. They sometimes look a bit rougher than studio paintings, but I hope they have a directness that's not achieved in any other way. So if you spot someone sketching in Newport or surrounding areas it may well be me.  Half the pictures on the Newport Gallery page, the more 'finished' looking ones, were done in my studio. (which means my attic), but they are always based on sketches from life.' He writes, the following in his booklet 'Newport and the Usk' which you can access via his webpage (see link above).  'The Usk is a primaeval presence underlying Newport.  Of all the impressions made on me, arriving as a child  of five in 1969, nothin

Jonathan Sherwood's paintings of the Usk

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Jonathan Sherwood's paintings of the Usk The footbridge takes you from the City centre to the relatively newly developed riverbank on the other side. The footpath winds past blocks of flats and the Old bus depot then under George St Bridge. For a short distance the route is litter strewn until you reach more modern flats. The rest of the way to Spytty, Lysaghts Institute and the White City bridge that you glimpse across the river in front of you. As you approach the bridge along the riverbank, partially hidden by bushes and trees, you might notice that as the river flows to the right towards the City Bridge, it appears to split into two, the larger course towards the bridge and the smaller to the left of a large tree topped outcrop. This virtual island splits the river in two and is surrounded by river mud. The left hand course of the river is a narrow stream that surrounds the outcrop on one side nearest to the riverbank. The unusual feature is about a quarter of a mile long and

River of Memories - John Tobin

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I was born in 1938 and have always lived in Newport. As a child I lived with my parents and brothers, Terry and Michael in our home at Windsor Road in Beechwood. Crossing the River Usk to the other side of Newport played a part in my childhood fascination with cinema and theatre, my entrance into the world of work and my love of drawing.  When we were children, our mam used to take my brother, Michael and myself on paddle steamer trips on the river. Perhaps the Glen Usk but there were other paddle boats. I don't think it was The Waverley. I loved it. We went to Penarth and over to Weston-super-Mare. On other trips we would sometimes go to Ilfracombe. I remember Dad taking us down to the engine room, watching these enormous levers rotating up and down, keeping the paddles turning and the smell of hot oil down there. Beautiful. And back on deck, chucking crusts of bread to the seagulls. Great memories.  When the war was on, my mother used to take us over Newport Bridge on the bus o